Week 12: Consider your own context within your school and with your mentee. How can understanding of controlled disruption and coherence making impact your leadership of peers at this time, and at this level ?

“Productive disturbance is likely to happen when it is guided by moral purpose and when the process creates and channels new tensions while working on a complex problem” (111).  We need leaders who can adapt to the school and the situations that arise within it.  If the tension gets too high, the stress level can cause a lot of problems.  “Principals not attuned to leading in a culture of change make the mistake of seeking external innovations and taking on too many projects” (2002).  If the leaders are watching closely, they can cue into this and change things accordingly.  With so many requirements and a huge amount of change there are several who pull away.  But if the disturbance is productive, we are more likely to buy into the process.  This is the idea of controlled disruption.

Coherence making is the idea of creating a logical, systematic way of dealing with the given situation.  When our leaders take charge and work through ways to achieve our goals rather than putting it upon us, it gives us a route to follow which is open to modification by the whole.  Knowing when to make a disturbance and when to focus on coherence making is key to keeping the community working together for the common goal(s).  “Coherence, then, is what is in the minds and actions of people individually and especially collectively” (Fullan, Quinn, 2015).

By knowing this I am even more excited to continue my mentoring project after this class is over.  This week I was able to get with my mentee’s students and present Storybird to them.  I logged into my account and shared with them a poem and a picture book that I had created ahead of time.  I then proceeded to demonstrate how to create a picture book or poem.  We (my mentee and myself) then walked around the room assisting students in creating their own stories.  It was such a huge success that they continued after lunch (I returned to help).  We were even able to publish a couple of stories (we went through the editing process with a few students).  The kids were so excited that they went home and shared it with their families.  Parents are excited to be a part of this now.

Just being able to incorporate a new site for this teacher really pushed her to expand what she normally does.  Even with the complications of the entire classroom of students, she saw the huge benefits of participating which helped to guide them towards her goal of teaching the students to publish their own books.  A little disruption went a long way towards coherence.

Works Cited

Fullan, M. (2002). The Change Leader. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/may02/vol59/num08/The-Change-Leader.aspx

Fullan, M. (2014, February). Leading in a Culture of Change. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass (pp. 107-120).

Fullan, M., Quinn, J. (2015). Coherence: The Right Drivers in Action for Schools, Districts, and Systems. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=STjrCQAAQBAJ&pg=PT11&lpg=PT11&dq=coherence+making+school&source=bl&ots=RL6snDUOB8&sig=3So-dlM_lhiloZHnnCuz5w4EIj0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CGIQ6AEwCWoVChMI97P8yeGbyQIVhC6ICh3jCQHl#v=onepage&q=coherence%20making%20school&f=false

Storybird site: https://storybird.com/

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5 thoughts on “Week 12: Consider your own context within your school and with your mentee. How can understanding of controlled disruption and coherence making impact your leadership of peers at this time, and at this level ?

  1. Sunshine- I agree with you that is disruption is controlled then more likely less will pull away and more will buy into the process. That is so awesome that you are continuing to work after class is over. Storybird sounds like an great program! It is always exciting when the students are excited especially about writing. I am glad things are going great for you!

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    • So is my mentee. She is such a great person and a well seasoned teacher, but change is hard. I was so glad she was happy to join in on the fun for my class. I am also very happy that the other two teachers (one of which it is her first year teaching) decided to also join in on learning about this cool app.

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  2. Sunshine- I agree with you that if disruption is controlled then more likely less will pull away and more will buy into the process. That is so awesome that you are continuing to work after class is over. Storybird sounds like an great program! It is always exciting when the students are excited especially about writing. I am glad things are going great for you!

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  3. Sunshine, I had to check out Storybird and I think it is something my students would really like to do. It sounds fun and engaging. It sounds like controlled disruption worked to gain coherence for you! I am also going to continue mentoring my colleague after this class is finished. She wants to move into learning about Class Dojo and I’ve heard from a few other teachers that they are also interested in it as well. So, I may be mentoring a small group of teachers. Have you thought about adding more teachers? Maybe one from your class (me) that you could mentor online in Storybird?

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    • I love that you are going to be continuing on after this class too. We have learned so much, and to share the information is so rewarding. It also helps us to learn more as well. Lee was the one who suggested Storybird, so I learned about it by testing it out then I went forth and introduced it to my mentee. It was so fun to see the kids work on their own books and publish them for their fellow classmates to read.

      Liked by 1 person

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